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Myst Will Not Die

myst_3ds_boxart.jpg

Many, many years ago, I borrowed a copy of Myst to see what the fuss was about. And I just did not get it. I happen to really enjoy point-and-click adventure games, but Myst just did nothing for me. And I tried one of the sequels that got ported to the PS2 as I recall, and even with better graphics and fancier animation I still couldn't get into it. But the game remains one of the biggest selling PC titles ever, and has made its way onto plenty of platforms. And now it's going to make its way to one more: The Nintendo 3DS. Maximum Family Games has announced that it is developing Myst for a March 27, 2012 release on the handheld.

"Myst is expected to be a big hit with Nintendo 3DS players," said Len Ciciretto, President of MFG. "It takes everything we all know and love about the Myst series and gives it a 3D facelift."

As with the original game, you will find yourself stranded on the island of Myst and have to solve various puzzles as you explore your surroundings and solve the mysteries of Myst. The 3DS version will not only add 3D graphics, but an additional age to explore, the RIME Age, for a total of six worlds. Not sure exactly how gameplay will work, though. I would've expected to tap directly on the objects with the stylus to manipulate them, but if they're going to be up on the 3D screen, I guess you'd have to use the joystick and buttons. So then, not sure what the touch screen would even be used for...

4 Comments

Keith said:

I too have tried Myst and came away confused as to what all the fuss is about. =P

ulkesh said:

Here's how I described it to a a friend who asked what the "fuss" was about:

Imagine a people who could write books. Not just write them, but Write them. These people were called the D'ni. Imagine that one of the D'ni with not just incredible writing skills, but truly astounding writing skills wrote a book. This book described a place so exactly, so precisely and with such life-like details that you --the reader-- could actually transport yourself to that world, that "Age", simply by placing your hand on the page.

If you decide to read them, over the course of the books you'll learn what happened to the D'ni, and why an entire society with the skills to write books like this was suddenly and very deliberately wiped from existence. Over the course of the games, you'll not only uncover their history and come to understand that history--good and bad--so that it will not be repeated, but also help to forge a better path for the few remaining D'ni.

On your Journey you will visit other "Ages," completely different worlds, through the use of "Linking Books". As you explore, you will uncover both some of the greatest and some of the worst things about a culture that spanned 10,000 years and yet was annihilated within a few days, leaving only shattered remnants behind. One of those shattered remnants is the troubled family that you unravel the story of in Myst. A family that is slowly, and with your help, trying to repair not only the damage to itself but also the damage caused by their civilization.


I personally am glad that it isn't dead or dying. I am one of those who absolutely love Myst, and the mythos that it spawned. The over-arcing story that starts out small, with a bitter rivalry between brothers that grieves their father, and ends up (over the course of the games) affecting not only the fate of this one family but that of two entire civilizations, is phenomenal.

I've played the games, read the books and have the music soundtracks. I'm also one of those who played the multiplayer portion of Uru, and enjoyed it immensely.

It'll be interesting to see how the 3D graphics will work. The Rime age was previously available in the RealMYST release of the game which was a re-release that used a fully 3D game engine that allowed for free roaming instead of a slideshow-style Hypercard presentation that was used in the original release

CPFace said:

I tried Myst when it first came out, and I, too, just didn't "get" it. You would wander around These environments and tap things, and sometimes you'd get a noise or an animation or something, but there didnt seem to be much point to it. The instructions didn't explain where you were or what you were meant to be doing. Even the "in case of emergency, read hints" booklet didn't really do anything for me.

I tried it again on the iPod just recently, and for whatever reason, this time it clicked. I tapped something I'd never tried before, which led me to an area where I found something that made me realize what was happening, and then it was like I fell down a rabbit hole.

The appeal of Myst, at least for me, is that the player isn't strongly guided or motivated or really invested much in what's happening. It's just stumbling upon this other world, slowly discovering the purpose and mechanics to all of these interesting machines, and stumbling upon pieces of shrapnel from the terrible event that left the world so eerily empty. Not a lot is directly explained; for the most part, you're free to apply your own interpretations to it.

The problem, of course, is that you can spend a lot of time wandering around not knowing what to do before you chance upon the point of it all.

KC said:

Wow. I think I just had a flashback of being 11 years old and playing Myst on the family computer in our basement. I'd wander around for hours unsure of what I should be doing...

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KC on Myst Will Not Die: Wow. I think I just had a flashback of being 11 years old and playing Myst on the family computer...

CPFace on Myst Will Not Die: I tried Myst when it first came out, and I, too, just didn't "get" it. You would wander around These...

ulkesh on Myst Will Not Die: Here's how I described it to a a friend who asked what the "fuss" was about: Imagine a people who...

Keith on Myst Will Not Die: I too have tried Myst and came away confused as to what all the fuss is about. =P...

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